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8 Days Mount Kilimanjaro Climbing Group Joining Lemosho Route

Overview

Lemosho variation is the ideal schedule for this route. On the 8 day Lemosho route, the trek from Barranco to Barafu is broken up into two days, allowing for a short day just prior to the summit attempt. This is important because summit day begins very early, around midnight, so climbers are sleep deprived going into the toughest day on the mountain. By having a short day beforehand, climbers can be better rested. Lemosho is considered the most beautiful route on Kilimanjaro and grants panoramic vistas on various sides of the mountain. It is our favorite route because it offers a great balance of low traffic, scenic views and a high summit success rate. Thus, Lemosho comes highly recommended. Most of our clients use Lemosho. The 8 day Lemosho route is highly recommended and used by most prominent Kilimanjaro operators.

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COST: $ 2,250 PER PERSON SHARING (SINGLE SUPPLEMENT FOR $ 225)

Minimum 2 people

Best time to visit: June - October

Duration

8 days

Price

from $2,250 /per person sharing (single supplement for $225)

Map Overview

Places to Visit

Day by Day Itinerary

Day 1 -Day 1 - Londorossi Gate - Mti Mkubwa Camp

The Lemosho Route departs from the far West side of Mount Kilimanjaro. Getting to Londorossi Gate (2,100 meters) takes approximately 2 hours from Moshi and longer from Arusha. At the gate, you will register with the Kilimanjaro National Park authorities before getting back into vehicles to be transported to the starting point which is a further 12km from Londorossi. During the wet season, the track can be very inaccessible to vehicles and you may need to walk the last few miles to the starting point. Most tour operators provide lunch at this point before starting the short trek to Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,820 meters). Spotting large wildlife like elephant and buffalo is possible on this stretch of the mountain and you will likely be accompanied by an armed guide in case one of the big five gets too close for comfort! Dinner will be served when you reach Mti Mkubwa Camp.

Inclusion

Meals: L, D

Accommodation

Budget camping

Day two starts with a gradual hike through the final stretch of the rainforest zone and then gets steeper as you approach the low alpine moorland zone. The trek is a long one that stops briefly for lunch at Shira Camp 1 which is on the western edge of the Shira Plateau; just over 8km from your starting point. The view of Kibo from across the plateau is amazing. Overnight at the Shira Camp.

Inclusion

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Accommodation

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We explore the Shira plateau for a full day. It is a gentle walk east toward Kibo’s glaciered peak, across the plateau which leads to Shira 2 camp on moorland meadows by a stream. T A variety of walks are available on Lent Hills making this an excellent acclimatization opportunity. Shira is one of the highest plateaus on earth.

Inclusion

Meals: B, L, D

Accommodation

Budget camping

We continue to the east up a ridge, passing the junction towards the peak of Kibo. As we continue, our direction changes to the South East towards the Lava Tower, called the “Shark’s Tooth.” Shortly after the tower, we come to the second junction which brings us up to the Arrow Glacier at an altitude of 16,000ft. We now continue down to the Barranco Hut at an altitude of 13,000ft. Here we rest, enjoy dinner, and overnight. Although you end the day at the same elevation as when you started, this day is very important for acclimatization and will help your body prepare for summit day.

Inclusion

Meals: B, L, D

Accommodation

Budget camping

After breakfast, we leave Barranco and continue on a steep ridge passing the Barranco Wall, to the Karanga Valley campsite. This is a short day meant for acclimatization.

Inclusion

Meals: B, L, D

Accommodation

Budget camping

After breakfast, we leave Karanga and hit the junction which connects with the Mweka Trail. We continue up to the Barafu Hut. At this point, you have completed the South Circuit, which offers views of the summit from many different angles. Here we make camp, rest, enjoy dinner, and prepare for the summit day. The two peaks of Mawenzi and Kibo are to be seen from this position.

Inclusion

Meals: B, L, D

Accommodation

Budget camping

Very early in the morning (midnight to 2 am), we continue our way to the summit between the Rebmann and Ratzel glaciers. You head in a northwesterly direction and ascend through heavy scree towards Stella Point on the crater rim. This is the most mentally and physically challenging portion of the trek.

At Stella Point (18,600 ft), you will stop for a short rest and will be rewarded with the most magnificent sunrise you are ever likely to see (weather permitting). From Stella Point, you may encounter snow all the way on your 1-hour ascent to the summit. At Uhuru Peak, you have reached the highest point on Mount Kilimanjaro and the continent of Africa. Faster hikers will see the sunrise from the summit.

From the summit, we now make our descent continuing straight down to the Mweka Hut camp site, stopping at Barafu for lunch. You will want gaiters and trekking poles for the loose gravel going down. Mweka Camp is situated in the upper forest and mist or rain can be expected in the late afternoon.

Later in the evening, we enjoy our last dinner on the mountain and a well-earned sleep.

Inclusion

Meals: B, L, D

Accommodation

Budget camping

After breakfast, we continue the descent down to the Mweka Park Gate to receive your summit certificates. At lower elevations, it can be wet and muddy. Gaiters and trekking poles will help. Shorts and t-shirts will probably be plenty to wear (keep rain gear and warmer clothing handy). From the gate, you continue another hour to Mweka Village. A vehicle will meet you at Mweka to drive you back to your Hotel book on your own arrangement

NB: Don’t forget to tip your guides and porters.

It is time for a celebration!

Inclusion

Meals: B

Accommodation

End of tour

Inclusions

  • Entrance Fees
  • All Meals (as specified in the day-by-day section)
  • Porterage
  • A professional driver/guide
  • All transportation (unless labeled as optional)
  • Government imposed increase of taxes and/or park fees

Exclusions

  • Tips (tipping guideline US$20.00 pp per day)
  • Climbing Gear
  • Sleeping Bag
  • Roundtrip airport transfer
  • International flights (from/to home)
  • Personal items (souvenirs, travel insurance, visa fees, etc.)
  • Travel insurance and medical repatriation

Frequently Asked Questions

These are general FAQ to guide your planning. For detailed information specific to your destination, please visit the corresponding page on our website.
What is the best time to climb Mount Kilimanjaro?
Most guided climbs have experienced guides and porters trained in first aid. In case of emergencies, evacuation procedures are in place, including the use of helicopters if necessary.
The duration of the climb depends on the route chosen, but most treks take between five to nine days to reach the summit and descend.
Altitude sickness can affect climbers due to the rapid altitude gain. It’s essential to acclimatize properly and be aware of symptoms such as headache, nausea, and dizziness.
No prior climbing experience is necessary, but a reasonable level of fitness and preparation is recommended for the trek.
Essential items include sturdy hiking boots, warm clothing, a sleeping bag suitable for cold temperatures, waterproof gear, and high-energy snacks. Check out our packing list for a comprehensive reference.
Yes, permits are required for all climbers, and they must be arranged in advance through a licensed tour operator.
Accommodation on Kilimanjaro varies depending on the route but generally includes tents for camping and lodges along the trekking route.
While it’s technically possible, climbing Kilimanjaro without a guide is strongly discouraged due to safety reasons and the complexity of the terrain.
The overall success rate for reaching the summit of Kilimanjaro is around 65-70%, with factors such as route choice, fitness level, and altitude acclimatization affecting individual success.
There are no strict age restrictions, but climbers must be in good health and sufficiently fit to undertake the trek.
Climbing Kilimanjaro is considered challenging, primarily due to the altitude and unpredictable weather conditions. However, with proper preparation and guidance, it is achievable for many trekkers.
Climbing Kilimanjaro is considered challenging, primarily due to the altitude and unpredictable weather conditions. However, with proper preparation and guidance, it is achievable for many trekkers.
While tipping is not mandatory, it is customary to show appreciation for the hard work of guides and porters. A suggested amount is around $20 USD per day, per person, but tipping amounts may vary based on the level of service and satisfaction.

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